Now, where did I put that book that belongs to whats-his-name …?

puffell_devices

This week is Dementia Awareness Week and although many of us have heard of Dementia, how much do we know about the symptoms and risk factors of this condition.

Dementia is a set of symptoms including memory loss and difficulties with thinking, problem-solving or language. It is a progressive condition and according to the Alzheimer’s Society, there are currently 850,000 people with Dementia in the UK, 40,000 of which are under 65. Two thirds of people with Dementia live in the community and with 60,000 deaths a year being directly attributable to Dementia and 670,000 carers of people with Dementia in the UK, it is a wide spread condition that has a massive impact on people’s lives.

Dementia can be caused by various diseases, such as Alzheimer’s, or a series of strokes.

There are many factors which can affect your risk of developing Dementia, some of which we can influence and some that we cannot

 Age is the most significant risk factor

 Genetics – 2/3 of people with Dementia are women

 Having diabetes, depression and some learning disabilities can increase your risk

 Suffering a head injury

 Being a smoker or a heavy drinker

 Poor diet and lack of exercise

 Limited social and mental activity

By improving our diet and activity levels, stopping smoking and reducing alcohol consumption, keeping ourselves socially and mentally active and managing conditions such as diabetes well, we can help to reduce our risk of developing Dementia.

Signs and symptoms to look out for in ourselves or those around us are

 Struggling to remember recent events or things that you have seen, read or watched, but being able to easily remember things from the past

 Forgetting the names of friends or everyday things

 Finding it hard to follow conversations or TV programmes, repeating yourself or losing the thread of what you are saying

 Problems with reasoning or thinking logically

 Feeling anxious, depressed or angry about your forgetfulness or others commenting on this

 Feeling confused even in a familiar environment

There is help available for people with Dementia and treatments which may lessen the symptoms, so if you do have any concerns you should visit your GP. For further details visit

www.nhs.uk or www.alzheimers.org.uk

You can find information and support to help you make important lifestyle changes, together with details of local services to access at Puffell.com or contact the ICE team on

0800 612 4580 or sue.pretty@icecreates.com

Make Better Happen with Mobile Responsive Websites

Google’s ‘mobilegeddon’ will shake up search results

ice digital magic

Test your website today using our free tool…

Global search engine, Google has announced that it will be rolling out a new mobile-focused algorithm from this week. This means that organisations with a website that has been optimised for mobiles and tablets will ‘out rank’ those with no mobile or poor mobile sites, and it will be harder for people using mobiles and tablets to find you.

Google expects the change to cause a big impact, potentially affecting traffic and revenue for a number of sites that heavily rely on search results.

The digital team at ICE have created a quick test for all our valued customers to check that their websites will continue to generate high search rankings. Simply add your url address into our tool and you will see how your website will appear across multiple platforms, in an instant. If your website looks good across all the platforms, you’re good to go. If not, please talk to our digital experts. ICE specialise in creating fully dynamic and responsive websites that provide truly engaging user experiences. We’re here to help, advise and build truly engaging user experiences for our citizens and communities.

Talk to The ICE Team

+44(0)151 647 4700 or jamie.billington@icecreates.com

The Role of Behaviour Change in Local Authorities Transformation

It is fair to say most public health, organisational development and HR professionals have a good grasp of behaviourICE change theories.

The challenge is understanding exactly how behavioural theories are used in an effective, evidence-based and scalable way. Having spent 16 years supporting local authorities teams deliver outstanding results in their communities, we have witnessed how teams can initially struggle with the concept that behavioural models do not have to be addressed in their entirety and can be ‘bent’ and deconstructed to apply different aspects as part of an ‘intervention mix’. There is also a misconception that behaviour change programmes lack a robust evidence base, or that innovation and trying something new can be risky and expensive.

Our workshops – “The Practical Guide to Changing Behaviours – The Key to Public Service Reform” – help you sort the facts from the myths. In a recent workshop we carried out with public health professionals, participants sparked debates and conversations, thinking about how behavioural theories might apply to specific topic areas such as alcohol, welfare, money and debt management, housing, smoking, healthy weight, physical exercise, social care, education and crime and disorder. Delegates were able to use the learning as a basis to segment and target different audience groups.

At the end of the workshop there is a growing understanding of the science underpinning behavioural theories and how this can be applied to your work, raising pertinent questions and real topical issues such as the role of choice and law in behaviour theories.

Our workshops are co-creative and fully participative with real challenges that can start to be solved. We help to facilitate these conversations within your team and to foster new ways of thinking about the role of behaviour change in health and local government. In one recent session, the concept of moving citizens away from states of dependency to interdependency, supporting themselves and one another (e.g. through peer support networks) instead of relying on organised intervention and the dreaded perception of the ‘nanny state’.

Here is some session feedback received from previous sessions.

“Thank you to all the team for coming over and delivering the Behaviour Change workshop event yesterday. I have to say I have received extremely positive and complimentary anecdotal feedback. Not one person I have spoken to (and I have informally canvassed a fair few opinions) has said they felt they wasted time or it wasn’t, at the very least, thought provoking. No small feat when, as you know probably better than most, there is always a fairly high degree of cynicism and scepticism with this type of subject area and senior teams.“

Your training will be led by Stuart Jackson. Stuart founded ICE in 1999. In his role as Chief Executive, Stuart is a passionate and ethical leader – inspiring and delivering sustainable change in communities and organisations across the UK. He is one of main driving forces and visionary behind ICE, establishing and embedding the unique values that have helped so many companies, communities and individuals to improve their lives and fulfil their potential.

He is passionate about understanding the symbiotic relationships between behaviour, values and culture, and uses this to drive positive social and organisational change with clients and networks spanning central and local government, the NHS, the Third Sector, and private sector organisations.

At present, Stuart is strategically working with senior civil servants and MPs, as well as health leaders, in CCGs, National Commission Board, Hospital Trusts and Pharmaceutical organisations, to drive the self care and well-being agenda. He was invited to present to Royal Society for Psychiatrists on the importance of behaviour change in the provision and commissioning of mental health and wellness services and at the World Social Marketing Conference in Toronto on the role of self care, behaviour change and drug adherence.

This workshop is a good CPD opportunity for senior leaders who provide services in Organisational Development, Service Transformation, Public Health, Social Justice, Neighbourhood Regeneration, Team & Succession Planning, Adult Social Care, Child Social Care and Integration.

Ask us about your behaviour change workshop – stuart.jackson@icecreates.com

The Role of Social Media in Behaviour Change Social Marketing

Sustainable behaviour change is achieved after more than just the promotion of Health & Wellbeing quotes, tips and Puffell Make Better Happen 3blogs via Facebook and Twitter shares likes and retweets.

It requires change agents / social marketing professionals to get “in the shoes of citizens” and engage in Behavioural Insight Research + Science + Storytelling.

Social Media is a modern communication tool or channel where we can engage with citizens and customers alike, and it can be a very powerful medium to support behaviour change social marketing.

The confusing bit now is that most people that I come across who engage in “commercial social media marketing” on Twitter, for example, use the same hashtag #socialmarketing to promote their products and services as the behaviour change agents from the world of social marketing use when promoting behaviour change #socialmarketing.

Our team here at ICE Creates and Puffell really like the behaviour change campaign #ThisGirlCan, which utilises the power of social media to inspire Health & Wellbeing behaviour change and has some great synergy with how we support citizens to #MakeBetterHappen via engagement on our Health & Wellness platform, Puffell.

Our wellness platform puffell.com is both a digital platform and an offline set of tools and experiences that supports self-care and self-management for behaviour change in relation to peoples Health & Wellbeing. Join in now for FREE

Email me: michael.jones@icecreates.com, or engage with me on social media via #MakeBetterHappen

Puffell supports International Day of Happiness

I’m very happy that the team at Puffell (puffell.com) are supporting #InternationalDayofHappiness, 2015.international day of happiness

Every year, Action for Happiness uses the 20th of March as a platform to launch a campaign to promote positive social action for a happier world. The theme always focuses attention on an important social issue related to wellbeing; this year, our theme is ‘Your happiness is part of something bigger’.

From this I think we fuse in Age UK #NotByMySelfie campaign and show our support (like me going to see my little nan).

“This epidemic of loneliness and isolation has very serious effects. Social isolation is as potent a cause of early death as smoking, and loneliness is twice as deadly as obesity.”

Have a very happy day!

 

Michael VJ Jones, ICE Creates Ltd (michael.jones@icecreates.com)

The 101 practical guide to creating sustained behaviour change

It is fair to say most public health professionals have a good grasp of behaviour change theories.

The challenge is understanding exactly how behavioural theories are used in an effective, evidence-based and scalable way. Having spent 16 years supporting public health teams deliver outstanding results in their communities, we have witnessed how teams can initially struggle with the concept that behavioural models do not have to be addressed in their entirety and can be ‘bent’ and deconstructed to apply different aspects as part of an ‘intervention mix’. There is also a misconception that behaviour change programmes lack a robust evidence base, or that innovation and trying something new can be risky and expensive.

Our workshops – “The Practical Guide to Changing Behaviours – The Key to Public Service Reform” – help you sort the facts from the myths. In a recent workshop we carried out with pubic health professionals, participants sparked debates and conversations, thinking about how behavioural theories might apply to specific topic areas such as alcohol, welfare, money and debt management, housing, smoking, healthy weight, physical exercise, social care, education and crime and disorder. Delegates were able to use the learning as a basis to segment and target different audience groups.

At the end of the workshop there is a growing understanding of the science underpinning behavioural theories and how this can be applied to your work, raising pertinent questions and real topical issues such as the role of choice and law in behaviour theories.

Our workshops are co-creative and fully participative with real challenges that can start to be solved. We help to facilitate these conversations within your team and to foster new ways of thinking about the role of behaviour change in health and local government. In one recent session, the concept of moving citizens away from states of dependency to interdependency, supporting themselves and one another (e.g. through peer support networks) instead of relying on organised intervention and the dreaded perception of the ‘nanny state’.

Here is some session feedback received from pervious sessions.

“Thank you to all the team for coming over and delivering the Behaviour Change workshop event yesterday. I have to say I have received extremely positive and complimentary anecdotal feedback. Not one person I have spoken to (and I have informally canvassed a fair few opinions) has said they felt they wasted time or it wasn’t, at the very least, thought provoking. No small feat when, as you know probably better than most, there is always a fairly high degree of cynicism and scepticism with this type of subject area and senior teams.“

Your training will be led by Stuart Jackson. Stuart founded ICE in 1999. In his role as Chief Executive, Stuart is a passionate and ethical leader – inspiring and delivering sustainable change in communities and organisations across the UK. He is one of main driving forces and visionary behind ICE, establishing and embedding the unique values that have helped so many companies, communities and individuals to improve their lives and fulfil their potential.

He is passionate about understanding the symbiotic relationships between behaviour, values and culture, and uses this to drive positive social and organisational change with clients and networks spanning central and local government, the NHS, the Third Sector, and private sector.

At present, Stuart is strategically working with senior civil servants and MPs, as well as Health leaders, in CCGs, National Commission Board, Hospital Trusts and Pharmaceutical organisations, to drive the self care and well-being agenda. He was invited to present to Royal Society for Psychiatrists on the importance of behaviour change in the provision and commissioning of mental health and wellness services and at the World Social Marketing Conference in Toronto on the role of self care, behaviour change and drug adherence.

Ask us about your behaviour change workshop – stuart.jackson@icecreates.com

 

What colour is the dress?

It seems the whole world was looking at one dress last week, and it was nothing to do with a celebrity on the red What colour is the dresscarpet. Just a basic question about a normal dress – ‘What colour is this dress?’

What I found really interesting about this was the debate: “It’s obviously white and gold”, “what do you mean white and gold? It’s blue and black”. People were passionate, I was passionate. We all saw something and couldn’t understand why others couldn’t see what we did. It’s understandable; we believe what we see – I believe what I saw. But then what I saw changed, I had told everyone it was blue and black, and then suddenly I saw it white and gold. Wow, my perspective changed!

I spend a lot of time in my job helping people look at things from a different perspective, the customer’s perspective. We gather lots of data to show what services feel like from a customer’s perspective – to ‘stand in a customer’s shoes’, to see what colour the dress really is. In organisations it can be difficult to understand that truth. To find out what it’s like now, but without that knowledge, we can’t hope to improve… we might just make it different. Later this week I’m kicking off a new piece of transformation and will use this story to explain why change needs to be based on real insight, not assumption. I’ll let you know how I get on.

In the end, I did my research, gathered more data, and you know what? The dress is actually….

You didn’t think I would say, did you?

If you’d like to know more about how ICE work with organisations to gain true insight and transform services, contact Chris Lunn (chris.lunn@icecreates.com) #intheirshoes

 

 

Learning new leadership and team skills – with sheepdogs!

A new form of leadership and team-building training is taking the business world by storm – using sheepdogs to allow managers to hone the art of gentle and non-aggressive personnel management.

By working with the natural elements of shepherding and sheep farming, managers attending the innovative courses in Cumbria are able to draw their own conclusions about their behaviour in the office, the boardroom, and clinical practice to find the best way forward.

“We don’t tell clients what they need to do or change, they work it out themselves,” says Stuart Jackson, co-founder. “That’s what makes the Your Natural Leaders experience all the more powerful.”

Why Work With Sheep Dogs? 

The benefits of working with dogs and sheep are many:

  • They are non-judgemental (they do not condescend or criticise) – everyone can learn constructively from mistakes and successes
  • They give an immediate response (they don’t discriminate no matter your position at work, and won’t move if they don’t want to) – you get instant and honest safe feedback, a perfect mirror to learn from.
  • They respond to non-verbal communication – meaning you learn how to make your message clear through your movements, posture, body language, and tone of voice (you already do this at work and at home, understanding your impact at this level is very empowering)
  • They reward your efforts once you have earned your authority and their respect – encouraging and developing leadership through rapport, respect and trust, not power and authority. It is truly remarkable.

The Your Natural Leaders Working Sheepdog Experience uses a unique combination of talent from the world of leadership, change specialists and sheepdog trialling.

Your Natural Leaders invites delegates to consider their own experience, styles and impacts from totally different perspectives. In every session people are often surprised by their own capacity to generate new, powerful and useful ideas, insights and models about their own experience as leaders and how they might move and change their models, strategies and tactics in the work place.

Surprisingly, a large number of people also find positive impacts for their personal lives too. Later sessions allow peers to support each other to explore how to deploy new behaviours in a safe way and build them around existing beliefs, both on the field and in the briefing and de-briefing sessions in our newly purpose-built Natural Leaders learning facility.

Click here to find out more about how you can get incredible value and a lasting experience that will truly make a positive difference and generate lasting outcomes from your training budget. 

Annual Reports: what the smart Communications and Marketing Managers are doing

If the thought of reading an annual report gives you a headache, you aren’t alone. Just thinking about the writing and designing of one is enough to make the most of us want to lie down in a darkened room.

But we all know that, if designed well and presented in the right format, annual reports are a great way to present your organisation’s achievements, as well as highlight what is unique.

The best annual reports will engage stakeholders and win you loyal fans; and as more emphasis is placed on creative presentation, it’s finally becoming the latest format to benefit from good design – online and offline. Here are examples of what the best are doing…

This interactive annual report from Shopify last year packs in a lot of data (and who doesn’t have to do that?) yet makes it easily digestible, using interactive elements. As a scrolling webpage, the report can combine readable graphs, eye-catching animations, linked images and a timeline of events to communicate engaging information. Check out how it encourages you to share key issues on social media too. 

Interactivity is not the preserve of slick international brands. We have experience of producing dynamic Prezis that really engage and capture audiences, for example. Click here to see how Heywood, Middleton & Rochdale handled their annual public health report using interactive Prezi, with embedded video links.

Check out how Kickstarter also incorporate video with the simple and clean presentation of data.

With the right support, you can make complex copy simple to read and use designs that are relevant to your organisation’s culture and ambition.

Most organisations publish a summary of the annual report intended for public consumption. Now you have seen these examples, how have you been inspired?

If you need a hand and would like ICE to provide you with additional support for your annual report, at an affordable cost and pace – come have a chat with us here.

Four essential steps to assessing organisation culture and employee values to drive innovation, creativity and growth

“Create thriving communities: listen to the needs of your employees and create an environment that helps them to thrive.”

The B Team / Virgin Unite, “New Ways of Working”, Jan 2015

(www.bteam.org / www.virgin.com/unite)

Back in the 80’s and 90’s, organisations started to put lists of ‘values’ up on walls and point at them and say, “these are our values now” – somehow expecting a shift in behaviour and performance. Or say something like “we’re implementing a transformation programme”, and later scoff: “we’ve tried all that transformation stuff and it didn’t work”.

But many organisations are now waking up to the realisation that smart and committed people are their most valuable resource.

Yes we’ve heard this before, but now we are living in an exciting period of time where the world is changing, and putting more focus on people: recognising the importance of their wellbeing, their values, and their beliefs. When you engage with people on this level you can expect significant impacts on creativity and innovation, productivity, and profitability.

At ICE we have been working with a number of clients to help them do just that. We have tools and approaches that help organisations create a balance between hard issues (such as processes and systems) on the one hand, and soft issues (such as culture and values) on the other. Working together, we ensure these are aligned and support the overall purpose and direction of the organisation.

How do we do this? 

So take ‘values’ for example. Values are usually based upon deeply held personal beliefs about the world, and reflect a person’s moral sense of right and wrong, or simply what they believe they ought to be. The aims of values is to provide us with an internal reference for what we think is good, beneficial, important, useful, beautiful, desirable, constructive, and so on. This helps us to understand why we do the things that we do, so putting a list of arbitrary values on a wall can actually be a bit of a waste of time – and in some cases, quite counter-productive.

So we have developed a unique enterprise mapping tool called ICE-Berg to assess sociability and conformance, and drive for advancement across an organisation. We also work with clients to develop question sets that enable us to map how well explicit values resonate within and across an organisation. Using this tool is one way of considering the four essential ingredients to assessing values alignment within an organisation. They are:

  1. Develop an understanding of the ‘desired-cultural-state’ based on real organisational needs rather than arbitrary sets of behaviours or values
  2. Map the ‘actual-cultural-state’ and identify actions to address any gaps; including transformation, training, and coaching interventions
  3. Develop a coaching culture based on regular reviews alongside existing performance and competency reviews
  4. Develop a foundation for succession planning and recruitment based on how well people resonate with cultural values and behavioural norms.

Using this approach we can create strong links between culture, purpose and systems, leading organisations to a tipping point – a fertile state for an organisation to begin its journey to sustainable excellence based on continual engagement and development of people.

For a free consultation and demonstration of the ICE-Berg assessment tool, contact Justin Wrench on justin.wrench@icecreates.com / 0151 647 4700.

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